The Space Reviewin association with SpaceNews
 

What is The Space Review?

The Space Review is an online publication devoted to in-depth articles, commentary, and reviews regarding all aspects of space exploration: science, technology, policy, business, and more. more info

Write for us!

Interested in contributing an article to The Space Review? Please read our submission guidelines.

RSS

Advertise here!

Related sites

spacetoday.net
Space news from around the web

This week in The Space Review…

ViviSat illustration

Filling in the details

Passage of a new commercial space bill last year marked the end of one effort, but the beginning of another. Jeff Foust reports on the various reports required by the bill and its implications for future commercial space legislation, either this year or beyond.
Monday, February 8, 2016

To look out from a higher plateau: the naming of Onizuka Air Force Station

For decades, military space programs were controlled out of a California facility later renamed after an astronaut killed in the Challenger accident. Joseph T. Page recalls the development, and ultimate demise, of Onizuka Air Force Station.
Monday, February 8, 2016

Rethinking the national security space strategy: part 3

Given the growing reliance on, and growing threats to, satellites, some argue that the US government should take a different approach to safeguarding their security. Christopher Stone discusses why the current deterrence approach should be replaced with an alternative.
Monday, February 8, 2016

Preserving our space heritage

While some lament the destruction of archeological artifacts during conflicts in the Middle East, most are unaware of how more recent space-related artifacts are falling apart elsewhere. Anthony French argues that those space relics, on Earth and in space, should be treated with the same respect as more ancient ones.
Monday, February 8, 2016

Review: SpaceX’s Dragon

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft, designed to carry cargo and eventually people, is perhaps just as important to the company as its launch vehicles. Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers what turns out to be a disappointing history of the vehicle’s development.
Monday, February 8, 2016


Previous articles:

Settling space is the only sustainable reason for humans to be in space

A recent commentary argued that, for a variety of reasons, humans will never settle Mars or other destinations beyond Earth. Dale Skran counters that settlement is ultimately the only reason for humans to be in space.
Monday, February 1, 2016

A different kind of spaceport

Last month, Arizona officials approved a plan to develop a spaceport for a company that, technically speaking, won’t be flying to space. Jeff Foust reports on the development of a new headquarters and launch site for World View, and its plans for high-altitude balloons for space tourism and other applications.
Monday, February 1, 2016

Using space resources to help all of humanity

The promise of accessing space resources on the Moon or asteroids brings with it the potential of massive wealth. Greg Anderson discusses how that can be used to benefit not just the companies involved but also those on Earth less well off.
Monday, February 1, 2016

Creating a July 20 space exploration day holiday

There’s no single holiday in the United States devoted to space exploration. J. David Baxter discusses the history of his efforts to create one, and the importance of having one.
Monday, February 1, 2016

Review: The Complete Space Buff’s Bucket List

Do you have a “bucket list” of space activities you want to do at some point in your life? If not, Jeff Foust reviews a book that provides a wide-ranging list of 100 such activities for devoted space enthusiasts.
Monday, February 1, 2016

The unfortunate provincialism of the space resources act

The commercial space bill enacted late last year provides rights for US companies to resources extracted form asteroids or other celestial bodies. Thomas Simmons discusses how the bill is a missed opportunity, though, since it doesn’t address resource rights internationally.
Monday, January 25, 2016

Elon Musk and the SpaceX Odyssey

Elon Musk has long made clear his long-term ambitions to establish a human presence on Mars, but that effort faces both opposition and competition. Tim Reyes argues that SpaceX needs to accelerate its efforts to make a reusable launch vehicle to maintain momentum for sending humans to Mars.
Monday, January 25, 2016

Future telescopes versus telescopes’ futures

At a recent astronomy conference, much of the discussion was about future space telescopes planned for launch over the next two decades. However, Jeff Foust reports there was also talk about existing and planned telescopes in space and on the ground that, in some cases, face uncertain futures.
Monday, January 25, 2016

(Star) trekking the through the Land of Enchantment: the New Mexico Space Trail

New Mexico isn’t always considered a space state, but it has a diverse heritage in spaceflight and astronomy. Joseph Page describes an effort to tie that history together through the New Mexico Space Trail.
Monday, January 25, 2016

The devil’s planet

Last week, astronomers announced evidence for the existence of a planet in the far outer solar system. Dwayne Day notes that the search for “Planet X” has inspired many works of fiction, including a Japanese manga from the 1980s.
Monday, January 25, 2016

And then there were three

Last week NASA awarded follow-on contracts for transporting cargo to and from the station to the two companies with existing contracts, plus one newcomer. Jeff Foust reports on the cargo contracts and the new life one contract offers to Sierra Nevada’s Dream Chaser.
Monday, January 18, 2016

NASA’s Journey to Mars and ESA’s Moon Village enable each other

As NASA pursues long-term plans to send humans to Mars, the leadership of ESA appears more interested in an international lunar base. A team of authors explain why the two approaches are not mutually exclusive.
Monday, January 18, 2016

China’s new space threat and the justification of US pre-emptive self-defense

New developments by China have raised concerns in the US about new anti-satellite capabilities. Brian Chow argues that the US should be prepared to take pre-emptive actions to protect its satellites in the event of a potential conflict.
Monday, January 18, 2016

CubeSat proximity operations: The natural evolution of defensive space control into a deterrence initiative

The increasing reliance by the American military on space assets brings with it increased vulnerability if those satellites are attacked. Michael Nayak describes how cubesats could pose a threat to those spacecraft, and how cubesats could also be part of the solution to deal with that threat.
Monday, January 18, 2016

Review: The Right Kind of Crazy

Achieving milestones like landing rovers on Mars requires not just technical expertise, but also ingenuity and the ability to deal with management issues and other obstacles. Jeff Foust reviews a book by the person who led the development of the Curiosity rover’s landing system on how he conquered those challenges.
Monday, January 18, 2016

The Moon in the crosshairs (part 4)

Dwayne Day concludes his review of US intelligence of Soviet lunar mission plans with monitoring of the failed N-1 launches of 1969, and how that overall intelligence affected NASA’s own plans for going to the Moon.
Monday, January 11, 2016

Accelerating the next, next space telescope

As NASA works to complete the James Webb Space Telescope for launch in less than three years, it’s also beginning work on the next major space observatory after it. Jeff Foust reports on the accelerated start of the WFIRST mission.
Monday, January 11, 2016

A snapshot of MOL in 1968

Recently declassified documents have provided new insights into the Air Force’s Manned Orbiting Laboratory program that was cancelled in 1969. John Charles examines what those documents tell us about the management and structure of the program.
Monday, January 11, 2016

Making Moon Day memorable

One of the challenges for the space community is outreach to the general public. Ken Murphy describes the successes and setbacks he’s encountered in one such effort, a “Moon Day” event in Dallas.
Monday, January 11, 2016

Review: Mars via the Moon

As NASA develops its long-term plan to send humans to Mars, some argue for precursor missions to the Moon not currently in NASA’s roadmap. Anthony Young reviews a recent book that lays out some of the arguments for going to the Moon first.
Monday, January 11, 2016

A step towards reusability

SpaceX successfully landed the first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket last month, an accomplishment widely heralded as ushering in a new era of reusable launch vehicles. Jeff Foust reports on the landing and the steps SpaceX still must take to make reusability a reality.
Monday, January 4, 2016

The Moon in the crosshairs (part 3)

Did the threat of a Soviet manned circumlunar mission weigh on NASA’s decision to fly Apollo 8? Dwayne Day examines what role, if any, intelligence on Soviet plans affected NASA’s planning.
Monday, January 4, 2016

Increasing the profit ratio

SpaceX recovered its first stage from a successful orbital launch. Sam Dinkin assesses progress of SpaceX toward its goal of reducing the cost of launch by two orders of magnitude.
Monday, January 4, 2016

Jurisdiction of the federal courts: An under-appreciated provision of the Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act

Much of the attention the recently enacted Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act received focused on provisions ranging from asteroid mining to launch indemnification. Michael Listner discusses another provision in the act that may be just as important as the others.
Monday, January 4, 2016

Bringing Asgard to Earth: Making a Thor Heritage District at Vandenberg

The last Delta II rocket will launch next year from Vandenberg Air Force Base, ending an era that dates back to the early days of the Space Age. Joseph Page argues that the launch facilities Delta and its predecessors used there should be preserved as a historic site.
Monday, January 4, 2016

Review: Go Flight!

Flight controllers play an essential role on NASA human spaceflight missions, but the individuals themselves are rarely known by name. Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a history of the early years of Mission Control and the people who helped create and staff it.
Monday, January 4, 2016

The Moon in the crosshairs (part 2)

Dwayne Day continues his examination of CIA monitoring of the Soviet Union’s manned lunar program by reviewing what the CIA learned of Soviet development of the N-1 rocket and its launch site from 1965 to 1968.
Monday, December 21, 2015

A little something for almost everyone

Congress passed a final appropriations bill for fiscal year 2016 last week, giving NASA nearly $19.3 billion, more than $750 million than requested. Jeff Foust analyzes the budget and finds that, at least for this year, there are far more winners than losers among the agency’s programs.
Monday, December 21, 2015

Space commercialization: finally ready for liftoff?

The promise of a rapid expansion of commercial space activities has existed for years, but has it finally arrived? Jonathan Coopersmith examines the prospects for greater commercial uses of space based on discussions at a recent conference.
Monday, December 21, 2015

GPS origins myths as propounded by Stephen Johnson and Annie Jacobsen

The Global Positioning System is one of the most commonly-used space-based services today, but its history is often misrepresented. Richard Easton takes issue with how the development of GPS is portrayed in two recent books.
Monday, December 21, 2015

The Moon in the crosshairs: CIA monitoring of the Soviet manned lunar program (part 1)

With the declassification of more records, we are gaining a better idea of how much the CIA knew about the Soviet human spaceflight program, and when. Dwayne Day looks at those documents to see how the CIA tracked the development of a Soviet program to send humans to the Moon.
Monday, December 14, 2015

Launch failures: the predictables

Launch failures always come as a surprise, but some failures were, in retrospect, more predictable and preventable than others. Wayne Eleazer discusses some of those failures and how warning signs leading up to them were overlooked.
Monday, December 14, 2015

Staking a claim to space resources

A small portion of a new commercial space law, dealing with space resources, has gotten an outsized degree of attention in recent weeks. Jeff Foust reports on the issues some have raised with that section of the bill and how US industry and government officials are defending it.
Monday, December 14, 2015

Powering a Moon base through the lunar night

One of the major challenges to supporting a lunar base is keeping it powered during the two-week lunar night. Joseph Barrett Bland, Michael Abramson, and Roger Arnold explore concepts for doing so using various beamed power approaches.
Monday, December 14, 2015

Review: Emblems of Exploration

NASA is famous for its logos, including the “meatball” and the “worm.” Jeff Foust reviews a book that provides a history of NASA’s insignia, including that developed by its predecessor, NACA.
Monday, December 14, 2015

Cygnus flies again

On Sunday, an Atlas V rocket successfully launched a Cygnus cargo spacecraft, the first mission to the space station for that spacecraft since a launch failure more than a year ago. Jeff Foust reports on the launch, the preparations for it at Orbital ATK, and the cargo it’s delivering to the station.
Monday, December 7, 2015

The Big G

Before NASA decided to develop the Space Shuttle, McDonnell Douglas proposed to NASA an enlarged variant of its Gemini spacecraft. Dwayne Day examines the “Big G” spacecraft concept studied in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Monday, December 7, 2015

Prospects for US-China space cooperation

NASA’s ability to cooperate with China is hamstrung by law that limits bilateral cooperation or even discussions without Congressional permission. Vid Beldavs argues that this prohibition should be lifted in order for the US to tap the growing capabilities of China and other emerging space powers.
Monday, December 7, 2015

Spurring commercial human spaceflight to the Moon

A new law offers American companies more rights and fewer restrictions for their commercial space activities, even as it’s being pressed by NASA to take on a bigger role in human spaceflight. Vidya Sagar Reddy examines if these factors can create a commercially-led human return to the Moon.
Monday, December 7, 2015

Review: Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age

A ongoing exhibition in London offers the prospect of seeing Soviet-era space hardware that is rarely, if ever, placed on public display. Jeff Foust takes a look at the exhibition and the message it offers about Soviet space ambitions.
Monday, December 7, 2015

How the new SLS engine contract is a step in the wrong direction

NASA announced last week a contract with Aerojet Rocketdyne to make an expendable version of the RS-25 engine for future Space Launch System missions. Gerald Black argues that, with the recent developments in reusability by others in the industry, developing expendable engines and rockets is unwise.
Monday, November 30, 2015

Expanding the space industry

While the space industry generates several hundred billion dollars in revenue a year, it’s still small compared to many other industries. Jeff Foust describes how a recent conference attempted to make connections between space and some other industries to help the space industry grow.
Monday, November 30, 2015

Financing space companies in an age of complexity

Companies in the commercial space industry, among others, can find it difficult to raise the money they need to build their businesses. Eric Hedman offers a potential solution that takes advantage of provisions in existing law, with some changes, to provide companies with a new source of investment.
Monday, November 30, 2015

Blue Origin sticks the landing

Last week, Blue Origin made another successful test flight of its New Shepard suborbital vehicle, this time flying to an altitude of 100 kilometers and successfully landing the vehicle’s propulsion module under rocket power. Jeff Foust reports on the implications of the successful test, and the reaction it got from the head of another company in the field.
Monday, November 30, 2015

Suborbital research makes a comeback

Several years ago suborbital research using a new generation of commercial suborbital vehicles appeared to be upon us, but delays in those vehicles’ development caused interest to wane. Now, both companies and advocates argue, it’s time for another look, as at least one company’s vehicle soon plans to start flying experiments.
Monday, November 23, 2015

Mars and the transport revolution

While the solar system is filled with resources that could solve humanity’s problems, effectively accessin them remains a major hurdle. Frank Stratford examines the transportation obstacles that need to be overcome, and the role Mars plays in enabling advances in spaceflight.
Monday, November 23, 2015

Pluto and the gap beyond

Earlier this month, New Horizons scientists discussed the latest results from July’s Pluto flyby at a planetary science conference. Jeff Foust reports on the surprising results presented at the meeting, which also featured concerns about the long-term future of exploration of the outer solar system.
Monday, November 23, 2015

Review: The Hunt for Vulcan

One hundred years ago this month, Albert Einstein destroyed a planet—a hypothetical one, conjured up to explain a puzzle of Newtonian mechanics. Jeff Foust reviews a book that described how astronomers thought another planet existed close to the Sun, only to have it wiped away by a new paradigm of physics.
Monday, November 23, 2015

Wrapping up a commercial space bill

The House voted Monday to approve a final version of a commercial space bill after many months of debate in public and behind the scenes. Jeff Foust examines what is contained in the final version of the bill that will affect companies involved in efforts ranging from space tourism to asteroid mining.
Monday, November 16, 2015

The last spacemen: MOL and what might have been

The Manned Orbiting Laboratory program was cancelled before the first mission could fly, but even in those early stages the military was contemplating what else it could do with MOL technology and humans in space. David Winfrey explores what could have been had MOL, somehow, avoided the chopping block more than 45 years ago.
Monday, November 16, 2015

Exposing the intended justice outcome of space law

Space law make frequent use of phrases like “common benefit” that are not formally defined, raising the possibility of disagreements among nations. Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty argues for a framework that can find common ground between developing and developed nations in space.
Monday, November 16, 2015

Review: Human Spaceflight

As NASA and other agencies and organizations weigh plans for human missions to Mars, what comes ater that? Jeff Foust reviews a book that argues that Mars may be the end of the line for humans traveling in space, but not for human exploration of space.
Monday, November 16, 2015

Overcoming non-technical challenges to cleaning up orbital debris

Dealing with the growing threat of orbital debris requires more than just technical solutions. Al Anzaldua and Dave Dunlop describe regulatory and other concepts to help implement solutions to mitigate and remediate orbital debris.
Monday, November 9, 2015

Future’s Past: The astronauts of 2001: A Space Odyssey

More than 45 years after its release, 2001: A Space Odyssey remains one of the classics of science fiction, and one of the most influential films on the American space program. Dwayne Day discusses a panel session at a recent conference featuring the actors who played two astronauts in the movie.
Monday, November 9, 2015

Adding layers to 3-D printing in space

Last year saw the first successful demonstrations of 3-D printing on the International Space Station. Jeff Foust reports on how one company is looking to build on this to develop new applications of this technology in space.
Monday, November 9, 2015

The lunar electrical power utility

Any development on the Moon, by either governments or commercial entities, will require access to significant amounts of electrical power. A group of lunar exploration advocates argue that the creation of a lunar power utility could help foster that development.
Monday, November 9, 2015

Review: Kepler and the Universe

Johannes Kepler was one of the key figures in astronomy four centuries ago, but many know him only for his laws of planetary motion. Jeff Foust reviews a book about Kepler that explores both his scientific accomplishments and life.
Monday, November 9, 2015

Blue suits and red ink: Budget overruns and schedule slips of the Manned Orbiting Laboratory program

Long before President Nixon cancelled the Manned Orbiting Laboratory program in 1969, it suffered growing costs and schedule delays. Dwayne Day looks how those issues set the program up for its ultimate demise.
Monday, November 2, 2015

Building a Moon village

The new head of the European Space Agency has proposed the development of an international lunar base, a concept he has promoted since prior to taking over the agency. Jeff Foust reports on the idea of a “Moon village” and one potential commercial angle for it.
Monday, November 2, 2015

Frederick C. Durant (1916-2015)

Frederick Durant, one of the key people who shaped the beginning of the Space Age, passed away last month. Randy Liebermann recalls his life and the roles he played in the US and internationally to promote spaceflight.
Monday, November 2, 2015

Environmental liability on the Moon

There is precedent on Earth for countries to take legal action if the suffer the environmental impacts of another nation’s activities, but what happens in outer space? Urbano Fuentes examines what legal regimes might work on the Moon and beyond.
Monday, November 2, 2015

Review: Countdown to a Moon Launch

As NASA prepares to resume launches of crewed missions beyond Earth orbit, what lessons regarding countdown preparations might the Apollo program offer? Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a detailed examination of Saturn V launch preparations with insights from the people who made those launches happen.
Monday, November 2, 2015

Looking back a year and a decade

This week is the first anniversary of both the Antares launch failure and the SpaceShipTwo accident, two major setbacks for the commercial space industry. Jeff Foust reports on the progress the companies involved in those accidents are making as they return to flight, as well as the gradual progress of the industry in general.
Monday, October 26, 2015

Launch failures: Titan Groundhog Day

In 1986, a Titan launch failed spectacularly just seconds after liftoff. Wayne Eleazer discusses why that launch failed and how it demonstrated systemic problems with the production of its solid rocket motors.
Monday, October 26, 2015

The International Code of Conduct: Comments on changes in the latest draft and post-mortem thoughts

A recent effort to negotiate an international code of conduct for outer space activities failed at the UN. Michael Listner examines some issues about the latest draft of the code and what its future prospects might be.
Monday, October 26, 2015

Review: Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs

What does dark matter, a leading mystery of modern-day cosmology, have to do with the demise of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago? Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a hypothesis linking the two and a broader lesson about the interconnectedness of science.
Monday, October 26, 2015

Blue suits in polar orbits: the MOL astronauts (part 1)

This week the National Reconnaissance Office is expected to release more details about the Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL), a 1960s program that would have sent military astronauts into space to carry out reconnaissance missions. Dwayne Day discusses what we know about MOL from the perspective of the astronauts selected for the program.
Monday, October 19, 2015

Delayed gratification: early results from the New Horizons Pluto flyby

Three months after New Horizons flew past Pluto, scientists have published the initial scientific results from the encounter. Jeff Foust reports on what scientists have found and what’s to come from the mission.
Monday, October 19, 2015

Solving the expendable lander and MAV trap

NASA plans for human Mars exploration, while still in its early stages of development, make use of a multi-stage expendable Mars ascent vehicle, or MAV. John Strickland argues that NASA would be much better off investing in technology to make that MAV reusable.
Monday, October 19, 2015

From airplanes to spacecraft

Within a few decades after the first commercial airline flight, commercial passenger aviation was wildly successful. Anthony Young examines what lessons from that era can be applied to the emerging commercial human spaceflight industry.
Monday, October 19, 2015

Review: Our Robots, Ourselves

For decades, space advocates have debated whether humans or robots where the best means by which to explore the solar system. Jeff Foust reviews a book that uses that debate as part of a broader argument about the roles, and limitations, of autonomy in various fields.
Monday, October 19, 2015

Declassified documents offer a new perspective on Yuri Gagarin’s flight

More than half a century after Yuri Gagarin made history as the first human in space, we are still learning new things about his brief flight. Asif Siddiqi provides some new information about Gagarin’s flight, and the problems he experienced, from old Soviet archives.
Monday, October 12, 2015

Under a Red Moon: LBJ, the President’s Daily Brief, and the Soviet super rocket

What information did President Johnson receive about the development of Soviet space capabilities? Dwayne Day examines newly released documents from his administration to see how he was kept informed on Soviet efforts in the race to the Moon.
Monday, October 12, 2015

Still chasing the Moon

More than eight years after it was first announced, a team competing for the Google Lunar X PRIZE now has a verified launch contract for its spacecraft. Jeff Foust reports on those latest developments as well as another effort to use crowdfunding to start a lunar mission project.
Monday, October 12, 2015

An alternate, rocket-free history of spaceflight

World War II and the development of the V-2 rocket helped accelerate the start of the Space Age, one that continues to make use of rockets descended from that vehicle. John Hollaway ponders an alternative history of spaceflight where the V-2 and its successors were never developed.
Monday, October 12, 2015

Review: When China Goes to the Moon…

Attendees of an international space conference this week will likely be looking for new information about China’s human spaceflight plans, including proposed human missions to the Moon. Jeff Foust reviews a book that attempts to provide more information about those human lunar plans and its potential effects on international cooperation and competition.
Monday, October 12, 2015

Dancing in the dark redux: Recent Russian rendezvous and proximity operations in space

In the last few years, Russia has carried out a number of missions to test rendezvous and proximity operations, both in low Earth orbit and geosynchronous orbit. Brian Weeden describes what is known about these efforts, and the policy implications of such tests given similar missions by American spacecraft in the past.
Monday, October 5, 2015

Orbiting first: a reasonable strategy for a sustainable Mars program

Last week, The Planetary Society released a report that came out of a workshop earlier this year on more affordable strategies for human Mars exploration. Casey Dreier and Jason Callahan discuss how an architecture that sends humans first to orbit Mars can fit into current NASA budgets for human spaceflight.
Monday, October 5, 2015

The Martian and real Martians

The film adaptation of the bestselling novel The Martian opened to rave reviews and a big box office take this weekend, days after NASA also announced evidence of liquid water on the surface of present-day Mars. Jeff Foust examines what effect—if any—these events could have on NASA’s plans for actual human missions to the Red Planet.
Monday, October 5, 2015

India’s space program looks outwards

India launched last week its first dedicated astronomy spacecraft, called ASTROSAT. Ajey Lele says the launch is another sign that India’s space agency is moving beyond its traditional role of socioeconomic development into science and exploration.
Monday, October 5, 2015

Putting the pieces back together again

A major gallery in the National Air and Space Museum looks more like a workshop right now, as part of renovations of that gallery. Dwayne Day explores how the gallery, and the museum, are changing.
Monday, October 5, 2015

The helium-3 incantation

Space advocates, including people as famous as Apollo 17’s Harrison Schmitt, talk about helium-3 as a vital resource to be obtained from the Moon. Dwayne Day says such claims, unsupported by the facts of just how difficult helium-3 fusion is, are analogous to the incantations of a religion.
Monday, September 28, 2015

The import of a satellite exporter’s bank

Over the last several years, US satellite manufacturers and launch providers have increasingly relied on the Export-Import Bank to help finance sales to international customers. Jeff Foust reports that, with the bank’s authorization lapsed because of a congressional dispute, these companies are starting to lose deals.
Monday, September 28, 2015

The next generation of activities for space’s next generation

Major space conferences have increasingly included sessions and other events devoted to your professionals and students. However, Hannah Kerner argues that these events have to go beyond simple panels and mentoring sessions to be meaningful for the space industry’s next generation.
Monday, September 28, 2015

Review: A Sky Wonderful with Stars

While plans for a new telescope atop Hawaii’s Maunakea are mired in controversy, using the mountain to study the universe is not new. Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a history of modern astronomy there, exploring both the observatories on the mountain and what those observatories have explored.
Monday, September 28, 2015

Blue goes to Florida

Last week, as expected, Blue Origin announced plans to build and launch a new orbital rocket from Florida’s Space Coast. Jeff Foust reports on the details of the announcement and how they fit into the company’s, and its billionaire founder’s, long-term goals.
Monday, September 21, 2015

A village on the frontier: The subtleties of space symbolism and rhetoric

When a cheering crowd celebrated New Horizons’ successful flyby by waving American flags, it struck some people as jingoistic. Dwayne Day discusses how the language and symbols of space advocates and space programs can be interpreted differently by different cultures.
Monday, September 21, 2015

An alternative space pilgrimage

Many space enthusiasts travel to Florida to visit the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex and its famous exhibits. Jeff Foust suggests those with a strong history in space history make a side trip to a nearby, small museum for some additional artifacts of the early Space Age.
Monday, September 21, 2015

Review: Rocket Ranch

The Kennedy Space Center is going through some of its biggest changes in decades, but they pale in comparison with the work 50 years ago to build its original facilities. Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a look at KSC’s early history, mixing technical details with the anecdotes of those who worked there.
Monday, September 21, 2015

Vulcan’s future

Most of the attention ULA has received for its Vulcan launch vehicle has focused on its use of an American-built main engine in place of the Russian RD-180. However, Jeff Foust describes some of the later innovations planned for the rocket, whose implementation could be affected by a proposed sale of the company.
Monday, September 14, 2015

India’s Round Table Conference on Issues for National Space Legislation

In July, members of industry, academia, and government in India convened a one-day conference to discuss space policy issues. Rachana Reddy summarizes the event, which included a call to develop national space legislation to aid India’s emerging space industry.
Monday, September 14, 2015

A one-year recap of CCtCap

This week marks the one-year anniversary of NASA’s award of commercial crew contracts to Boeing and SpaceX. Jeff Foust reports on some recent developments reported by both companies, and the ongoing funding concerns the overall program faces.
Monday, September 14, 2015

Mars Nation

Opponents of proposals to send humans to Mars state that there are many more pressing problems to solve on Earth. Frank Stratford argues that by going to Mars, and dealing with the challenges of living there, we will be better equipped to deal with the Earth’s problems.
Monday, September 14, 2015

Back from the brink: Akatsuki returns to Venus

In December, the Japanese space agency JAXA will attempt to place its Akatsuki spacecraft into orbit around Venus, after a previous orbital insertion maneuver five years ago failed. Ralph Lorenz explains what went wrong the first time around for the spacecraft and why JAXA hopes this time will be different.
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Why there’s no “space candidate”

As the 2016 Presidential campaign ramps up, space advocates are trying to determine which candidate offers the best, or at least any, views regarding space policy. Jeff Foust argues that, right now, there’s little to go on, and that it may not matter in the long run anyway.
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Phase Zero and the unique parallels of space and cyber

Military forces, and society in general, is increasingly reliant on space and cyberspace capabilities, and thus increasingly vulnerable to attacks on those systems. Jamie Johnson discusses the parallels between space and cyber and how both play a key role in winning any future conflicts before they start.
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Review: Sacramento’s Moon Rockets

Often overlooked in the history of the Apollo program is the role played by a site near Sacramento, California, in testing the Saturn V’s third stage. Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a pictorial history of that long-abandoned test site.
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Getting there is still the hardest part

While interest in smallsats continues to grow, one factor limiting their growth is launch access. Jeff Foust reports on developments in both dedicated and secondary launches of such satellites discussed at a recent conference.
Monday, August 31, 2015

The Martian message

Many space advocates are hoping public interest in the upcoming movie The Martian can translate into interest in real space exploration. Eric Sterner offers a cautionary word, arguing that a good story about a fictional Mars mission doesn’t mean people will start clamoring for the real thing.
Monday, August 31, 2015

A very British coup: Lessons from the draft UK regulations for CubeSats

The British government, seeking to play catchup in the global space industry, has drafted new regulations that would streamline the licensing of some smallsats. Christopher Newman and Michael Listner explain how those regulations would work and how they compare with existing smallsat regulations in the US.
Monday, August 31, 2015

Review: STS-135 Atlantis: Covering the Last Shuttle Ever

It’s been more than four years since the last shuttle mission, but for some the memories of that final flight remain strong. Jeff Foust reviews a book by a photographer who covered that mission, offering his own personal account, and photos, of that experience.
Monday, August 31, 2015

CubeSats to Mars and beyond

As CubeSats take on an wider range of missions in Earth orbit, some are looking at how such small spacecraft could be used on interplanetary missions. Jeff Foust reports on those efforts discussed at a recent conference, from serving as a communications relay for a Mars lander mission to being Mars landers themselves.
Monday, August 24, 2015

Second horizon

Long before New Horizons lifted off on its mission to Pluto, the project team was proposing the development of a second, similar spacecraft. Dwayne Day discusses that proposal and what happened to it at NASA and in the halls of Congress.
Monday, August 24, 2015

Major unfinished business in the the US space program

With less than 18 months left in the current Presidential administration, some argue there’s little chance of major new space initiatives from the White House in that time. However, Vid Beldavs, in an open letter to the President, asks him to support a new emphasis on lunar exploration in cooperation with international and commercial partners.
Monday, August 24, 2015

The risks of Mars

Many people consider a human mission to Mars with trepidation given the risks involved, including the potential loss of life. Frank Stratford argues that humanity needs to accept and even embrace those risks, given the much greater benefits such missions offer.
Monday, August 24, 2015

Review: Moonshots and Snapshots of Project Apollo

The history of the Apollo program has been told time and time again, often using the same familiar set of images. Jeff Foust reviews a book that, like a similar one on Mercury and Gemini, dips into archives for some rare glimpses of those missions.
Monday, August 24, 2015

Red planet rumble

During the annual Mars Society conference last week, the CEO of Mars One and a member of his technical team debated two critics of the one-way venture from MIT. Dwayne Day recaps the event, which exposed a lack of detail in Mars One’s technical plans.
Monday, August 17, 2015

The unnatural selection of planetary missions

The process of sorting through dozens of proposals for NASA missions is a thankless job for an anonymous group of reviewers. Ralph Lorenz explains the challenges involved with developing and reviewing mission proposals.
Monday, August 17, 2015

A funding breakthrough for SETI

Efforts in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence got a boost last month when a Russian billionaire pledged $100 million over ten years for SETI projects. Jeff Foust reports what that $100 million means for SETI projects and who might be left out, at least for now.
Monday, August 17, 2015

Harnessing The Martian

In October, the film version of the bestselling book The Martian hits theaters. Rick Zucker and Chris Carberry discuss how space advocates can use the release of the film about a fictional human Mars mission to build support for the real thing.
Monday, August 17, 2015

Apollo 13 splashes down in Oshkosh

Forty-five years after their dramatic mission, the two surviving members of the Apollo 13 crew joined two others involved with the mission at the EAA AirVenture show last month. Eric Hedman describes their presentation on the mission, and what the famous movie got wrong.
Monday, August 17, 2015

The pathways for a journey to Mars

More than a year after a National Research Council report laid out pathways for human missons to Mars, NASA is taking a higher-level approach for the journey of humans to Mars. Jeff Foust reports that NASA officials believe they are on the same page, more or less, as the committee’s report.
Monday, August 10, 2015

EAA AirVenture 2015 or bust

The EAA AirVenture event is now only one of the biggest air shows around, it’s also one with a significant space presence. Eric Hedman provides an overview of his week at last month’s AirVenture.
Monday, August 10, 2015

Reduced gravity: the 400-kilogram gorilla in the room

Sending humans to Mars requires dealing with a number of biomedical issues. Gerald W. Driggers discusses how NASA and other have neglected one key issue: how the human body handled reduced levels of gravity.
Monday, August 10, 2015

Review: German Rocketeers in the Heart of Dixie

Opinions of Wernher von Braun and other German rocket scientists who came to America after World War II have changed given a deeper understanding of the role they played int the war. Jeff Foust reviews a book that explores why one community has been slower to make such a reconsideration.
Monday, August 10, 2015

A failure of foresight and oversight

The National Transportation Safety Board wrapped up its investigation last week into last year’s SpaceShipTwo accident. Jeff Foust reports on new details about the accident released as part of the investigation, and the underlying problems the board found with the vehicle’s developer and regulator.
Monday, August 3, 2015

The engine problem

The US Air Force is embarking on a program to develop a new engine to replace the Russian-built RD-180 currently used on the Atlas V. Wayne Eleazer explains how this situation is the result of decades of neglect and other problems with the American launch vehicle industry.
Monday, August 3, 2015

Remembering Claudia J. Alexander

Claudia Alexander, a planetary scientist and mission manager, passed away last month. David Clow remembers her as a passionate advocate for the exploration of the universe.
Monday, August 3, 2015

Building the 21st century space museum

A new interactive aerospace exhibit opened last week at the National Air and Space Museum. Jeff Foust notes that the exhibit is also a way to shape the future of the museum itself.
Monday, August 3, 2015

1997, 2001, 1999: a science fiction calendar from the Apollo era

As Apollo flew people to the Moon, the science fiction shows people watched on TV and at the movies painted a bright future for human spaceflight, but one in retrospect was wholly unrealistic. Andre Bormanis examines that disconnect between those visions of the future and what came to pass.
Monday, July 27, 2015

Cutting the costs of a human return to the Moon

Governments have largely deferred plans for human missions to the Moon, citing their cost, while private ventures offer more affordable concepts but struggle to raise funding. Jeff Foust reports on a new study that argues that a combination of the two, through public-private partnerships, could reduce the cost of human missions by as much as an order of magnitude.
Monday, July 27, 2015

The mission of Zond 3

Fifty years ago, the Soviet Union launched a spacecraft that flew past the far side of the Moon and into deep space. Andrew LePage describes the mission of Zond 3 and how it fit into Soviet plans for missions to Mars and Venus.
Monday, July 27, 2015

Review: Seeing Like A Rover

Operating Mars rovers is more complicated than simply driving across the terrain and collecting images and other scientific data. Jeff Foust reviews a book that offers a behind-the-scenes look at the operations of the Mars Exploration Rovers and how scientists analyze and manipulate the data those rovers have returned to better understand the Red Planet.
Monday, July 27, 2015

They did it: New Horizons flies past Pluto

On Tuesday, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew past Pluto, collecting images and other data that it is slowly returning to Earth. Jeff Foust reports on the celebrations at the Applied Physics Lab that marked the successful flyby and the first look at images that are surprising the mission’s science team.
Monday, July 20, 2015

Flash foresight, hard trends, and commercial space business

SpaceX’s pursuit of reusable launch vehicles has prompted other companies to also study reusability. Anthony Young sees this as evidence of a “hard trend” that makes it all the more likely that reusability will become reality.
Monday, July 20, 2015

Is “NewSpace” obsolete?

For about a decade, commercial space advocates have been promoting the term “NewSpace” to describe a new wave of entrepreneurial space ventures. As those ventures now reach critical market and funding mass, Jeff Foust explains that some think the term may now be outdated in some respects.
Monday, July 20, 2015

Review: How We’ll Live on Mars

As space agencies like NASA make long-term plans for human missions to Mars, some expect private ventures to get there faster. Jeff Foust reviews a book, patterned after a TED talk, that argues that SpaceX in particular could get there faster.
Monday, July 20, 2015

A midsummer classic

On Tuesday, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will fly past Pluto, offering our first closeup glimpse at this distant world. Jeff Foust provides an update on the mission, including its close call with catastrophe because of a computer glitch earlier this month.
Monday, July 13, 2015

What about the next Pluto mission?

As New Horizons zooms past Pluto this week, the natural question many ask is, what’s next? Andrew LePage offers some concepts for future missions to Pluto and other destinations in the outer solar system.
Monday, July 13, 2015

One last first time

The last time we got a fleeting, closeup look at a distant world prior to New Horizons was the Voyager 2 flyby of Neptune in 1989. Dwayne Day recalls his experience witnessing that flyby from a planetarium in upstate New York.
Monday, July 13, 2015

What’s the long-term future of the ISS?

Much of the current attention on the International Space Station has been on problems getting cargo to the station. Jeff Foust reports that, at a recent conference, some were more concerned about what will happen to the station in the long run.
Monday, July 13, 2015

GAMBIT in the house

At long last, a 1960s-era GAMBIT reconnaissance satellite is on display at the National Air and Space Museum. Dwayne Day recaps the history of the program and describes the efforts it took to get the spacecraft displayed at the famous museum.
Monday, July 6, 2015

Thirty meter troubles

Construction of a telescope on a Hawaiian mountain has stopped because of protests from those who believe it would desecrate what some native Hawaiians consider a sacred place. Jeff Foust reports on the controversy and what some astronomers are doing to try and find a resolution acceptable to all.
Monday, July 6, 2015

Is India turning a blind eye to space commerce?

This month, India will carry out its biggest commercial launch to date, of five satellites weighing nearly 1,500 kilograms. Narayan Prasad argues that, despite this milestone, India needs to do more to promote commercial space ventures in the country.
Monday, July 6, 2015

Review: Leaving Orbit

To some, the end of the shuttle program represented an end of an era of American human spaceflight, or even an end to American human spaceflight itself. Jeff Foust reviews a book by a writer who attended the final shuttle launches in an attempt to understand the shuttle’s end and its implications.
Monday, July 6, 2015

Visit the Archive for additional articles.


ISPCS 2015